Post-summer golf for juniors
Metro creative
By Hans Kersting, Golf Professional
Friday, September 1st, 2017

With the summer ending and school back in session, it’s time to figure out how to keep your juniors interested in golf.

Let’s face it, it’s a lot easier to maintain their interest during summer golf camps and tournaments. However, once the school year begins, it becomes much more challenging to find the time to maintain the skills they grooved over the past couple of months.

I am a strong believer in extra-curricular activities for kids in school.

My daughter is a dancer, and she must find the time to balance her school work with her dance commitments. My son plays little league baseball, and he understands that baseball doesn’t happen if he doesn’t finish his homework before practice.

Golf offers the same challenges for both juniors and their parents.

Being an individual sport has both its advantages, as well as its disadvantages. One advantage is that no teammates are required for you to practice and enjoy the game.

A disadvantage, however, is that this individual aspect of the game creates a tremendous challenge for parents to maintain their child’s interest in the game.

My suggestion is to follow the example set by one of my fourth-grade students. Her family set up an after-school golf program with the school, and arranged for the small group to meet at a driving range one or two afternoons during the week.

With the assistance of either a parent, or preferably a local pro, this junior golf group has allowed for these children to maintain their interest in the game throughout the school year.

If this after school program is not a possibility, it’s a good idea to incorporate as much golf as you can on the weekends. Even if that means taking your child to play miniature golf, the idea of playing golf will remain fresh in their minds, and they will look forward to the next time they get to go out to play.

Golf is a truly unique game.

No game can be as individually challenging, yet also be so rewarding at the same time. Golf teaches us to be disciplined, patient, and honest.

These are attributes that any parent would like to instill in their children. For this reason, taking the time to keep your junior golfer involved in the game throughout the school year is very important.

As important as I believe extra-curricular activities can be for children in school, they can also present a tremendous challenge.

Keeping up with school work, and having somebody able to drive them to their after-school destination can be difficult. If you can keep your junior involved in golf after school that is great.

If not, do your best to keep them involved some on the weekends. This may require quite a bit of effort right now, but their continued passion for the game of golf will be a tremendous reward for you in the future.

 

 

About the author

Hans Kersting

Hans Kersting, Golf Professional

Metro creative

Post-summer golf for juniors

With the summer ending and school back in session, it’s time to figure out how to keep your juniors interested in golf.

Let’s face it, it’s a lot easier to maintain their interest during summer golf camps and tournaments. However, once the school year begins, it becomes much more challenging to find the time to maintain the skills they grooved over the past couple of months.

I am a strong believer in extra-curricular activities for kids in school.

My daughter is a dancer, and she must find the time to balance her school work with her dance commitments. My son plays little league baseball, and he understands that baseball doesn’t happen if he doesn’t finish his homework before practice.

Golf offers the same challenges for both juniors and their parents.

Being an individual sport has both its advantages, as well as its disadvantages. One advantage is that no teammates are required for you to practice and enjoy the game.

A disadvantage, however, is that this individual aspect of the game creates a tremendous challenge for parents to maintain their child’s interest in the game.

My suggestion is to follow the example set by one of my fourth-grade students. Her family set up an after-school golf program with the school, and arranged for the small group to meet at a driving range one or two afternoons during the week.

With the assistance of either a parent, or preferably a local pro, this junior golf group has allowed for these children to maintain their interest in the game throughout the school year.

If this after school program is not a possibility, it’s a good idea to incorporate as much golf as you can on the weekends. Even if that means taking your child to play miniature golf, the idea of playing golf will remain fresh in their minds, and they will look forward to the next time they get to go out to play.

Golf is a truly unique game.

No game can be as individually challenging, yet also be so rewarding at the same time. Golf teaches us to be disciplined, patient, and honest.

These are attributes that any parent would like to instill in their children. For this reason, taking the time to keep your junior golfer involved in the game throughout the school year is very important.

As important as I believe extra-curricular activities can be for children in school, they can also present a tremendous challenge.

Keeping up with school work, and having somebody able to drive them to their after-school destination can be difficult. If you can keep your junior involved in golf after school that is great.

If not, do your best to keep them involved some on the weekends. This may require quite a bit of effort right now, but their continued passion for the game of golf will be a tremendous reward for you in the future.