How outside disturbances can affect your game
By Hans Kersting, Golf Professional
Friday, June 1st, 2018

Have you been following the drama surrounding 2009 U.S. Open Champion, Lucas Glover, and his wife?

According to police reports, on May 12, after a third round 78 at The Players Championship, Glover and his mother were attacked by his wife, Krista.

All of this allegedly stemming from her displeasure of the round Glover had just played. She was arrested that evening and was released from jail the next day.

Now, I don’t know any additional details regarding this matter, but, usually, in these types of cases, it happens behind closed doors and is not reported. I feel bad for Glover, and I hope that Krista can receive some much-needed counseling.

Golf is perhaps the most difficult sport in the world.

For tour players, there is nobody to hide behind when you are out on the course. Every mistake is magnified, especially when playing in front of the gallery and the cameras.

Because of this, it is essential to have the support of loved ones when things aren’t going well.

Outside disturbances can have a negative effect on all athletes, let alone professional golfers.

The ability to remain focused on the task at hand while blocking everything else out is a skill that very few possess. I, certainly, struggled with this while I was attempting to play professionally.

While I was competing professionally, most of my expenses were being handled by various sponsors I had met along the way. Without their financial support, I would have been very limited in my attempt to start my career.

However, the financial support I was receiving created a disturbance that effected my performance on the course. I found myself being more concerned with how my sponsors were perceiving my performance, rather than being completely focused on playing my best golf.

This, ultimately, led to my decision that playing professionally wasn’t the right path for me.

If Glover has been dealing with outside disturbances, especially from home, I can’t help but wonder how it has affected his game.

Regardless, I hope that his life off the golf course clears up so that he can focus on playing his best golf, without the concern of upsetting his wife.

Until that happens, I’ll certainly be following his results more closely than I had before.

About the author

Hans Kersting

Hans Kersting, Golf Professional

How outside disturbances can affect your game

Have you been following the drama surrounding 2009 U.S. Open Champion, Lucas Glover, and his wife?

According to police reports, on May 12, after a third round 78 at The Players Championship, Glover and his mother were attacked by his wife, Krista.

All of this allegedly stemming from her displeasure of the round Glover had just played. She was arrested that evening and was released from jail the next day.

Now, I don’t know any additional details regarding this matter, but, usually, in these types of cases, it happens behind closed doors and is not reported. I feel bad for Glover, and I hope that Krista can receive some much-needed counseling.

Golf is perhaps the most difficult sport in the world.

For tour players, there is nobody to hide behind when you are out on the course. Every mistake is magnified, especially when playing in front of the gallery and the cameras.

Because of this, it is essential to have the support of loved ones when things aren’t going well.

Outside disturbances can have a negative effect on all athletes, let alone professional golfers.

The ability to remain focused on the task at hand while blocking everything else out is a skill that very few possess. I, certainly, struggled with this while I was attempting to play professionally.

While I was competing professionally, most of my expenses were being handled by various sponsors I had met along the way. Without their financial support, I would have been very limited in my attempt to start my career.

However, the financial support I was receiving created a disturbance that effected my performance on the course. I found myself being more concerned with how my sponsors were perceiving my performance, rather than being completely focused on playing my best golf.

This, ultimately, led to my decision that playing professionally wasn’t the right path for me.

If Glover has been dealing with outside disturbances, especially from home, I can’t help but wonder how it has affected his game.

Regardless, I hope that his life off the golf course clears up so that he can focus on playing his best golf, without the concern of upsetting his wife.

Until that happens, I’ll certainly be following his results more closely than I had before.