Robert W. Burton | The Signal Needs Sports Letters and a Literary Critic
By Signal Contributor
Friday, December 7th, 2018

The Signal needs to have sports letters to the editor in their section of sports — that is, more than just letters to the editor on the opinion page, and The Signal needs to have a literary critic, as well.

For The Signal, a sports page letters to the editor should add more vigor to the newspaper, and a literary critic should, also, add to the circulation of The Signal, immensely.

In my opinion, Tyson Fury is just an average fighter who stacks up wins only because he is so big and strong — 6 feet, 9 inches, and came into the fight against Deontay Wilder at 256 pounds, coming down in weight from an even 400 pounds.

A British fighter who lost his heavyweight title because of inactivity within the boxing ring, Tyson was no longer champion against Mr. Wilder. Mr. Tyson Fury proved to me that he shall always be no more than an asterisk in boxing history. The fight ended a draw.

In “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,” by Mark Twain, Huck befriends Jim, and Jim — who is illiterate, cannot read or write — gives a letter to Huck that says that Jim has been given his freedom, but Huck pretends that the letter is sending Jim down the river, that is, to a new, vicious master.

Thus, Huck is playing games with Jim when the former says that he will protect him. Hence, the adventures of Huck and Jim. At any rate, Huck and Jim, ultimately, get caught by slave masters, and Jim is put in handcuffs to be taken back to his master. Then Huck shows the letter to the slave masters, and they, the slave masters, free Jim, saying something to the effect that, “Why did not you tell us that Jim had gained his freedom?”

Thus ends the story.

The story has many toils and tribulations for Jim, when they did not need to be, but the story, to be certain, points out the nature of human beings always wanting to play games with the naive, and in this case Jim was naive because he could not read or write, and Huck took advantage of Jim’s illiteracy, thereby illustrating that human beings enjoy playing games with others whenever they get the chance.

Indeed, yes, The Signal needs a letter to the editor section in their sports’ page, as well as a literary critic — and soon.

Robert W. Burton

Santa Clarita

About the author

Signal Contributor

Signal Contributor

Robert W. Burton | The Signal Needs Sports Letters and a Literary Critic

The Signal needs to have sports letters to the editor in their section of sports — that is, more than just letters to the editor on the opinion page, and The Signal needs to have a literary critic, as well.

For The Signal, a sports page letters to the editor should add more vigor to the newspaper, and a literary critic should, also, add to the circulation of The Signal, immensely.

In my opinion, Tyson Fury is just an average fighter who stacks up wins only because he is so big and strong — 6 feet, 9 inches, and came into the fight against Deontay Wilder at 256 pounds, coming down in weight from an even 400 pounds.

A British fighter who lost his heavyweight title because of inactivity within the boxing ring, Tyson was no longer champion against Mr. Wilder. Mr. Tyson Fury proved to me that he shall always be no more than an asterisk in boxing history. The fight ended a draw.

In “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,” by Mark Twain, Huck befriends Jim, and Jim — who is illiterate, cannot read or write — gives a letter to Huck that says that Jim has been given his freedom, but Huck pretends that the letter is sending Jim down the river, that is, to a new, vicious master.

Thus, Huck is playing games with Jim when the former says that he will protect him. Hence, the adventures of Huck and Jim. At any rate, Huck and Jim, ultimately, get caught by slave masters, and Jim is put in handcuffs to be taken back to his master. Then Huck shows the letter to the slave masters, and they, the slave masters, free Jim, saying something to the effect that, “Why did not you tell us that Jim had gained his freedom?”

Thus ends the story.

The story has many toils and tribulations for Jim, when they did not need to be, but the story, to be certain, points out the nature of human beings always wanting to play games with the naive, and in this case Jim was naive because he could not read or write, and Huck took advantage of Jim’s illiteracy, thereby illustrating that human beings enjoy playing games with others whenever they get the chance.

Indeed, yes, The Signal needs a letter to the editor section in their sports’ page, as well as a literary critic — and soon.

Robert W. Burton

Santa Clarita