Curtis Woods: Water districts’ $14 million savings – what does this mean?
By Signal Contributor
Wednesday, May 17th, 2017

Imagine what $14 million in savings can do for Santa Clarita Valley residents.

This amount is the projected savings achieved by creating a new water district from the existing Castaic Lake Water Agency (CLWA) and Newhall County Water District (NCWD). If it sounds like a lot, it is.

In fact, it is $1 million more than Newhall County Water District’s annual budget!

So what can these savings do for us, customers of NCWD or CLWA’s Santa Clarita Water Division?

First, they could positively impact local water rates. While fluctuations to rates are generally based on numerous (and oftentimes uncontrollable) factors, savings could be used to keep rates low for customers.

The $14 million could also help build critical infrastructure. Whether it’s modernizing outdated pipes or creating a new recycled water program, these savings could go a long way to improving our local water system.

It could also be used to upgrade customer service and create new benefits for the public. New technologies and web-based tools can be a part of a modern water agency.

Putting the savings to use will be the decision of the new Board of Directors for the new water district. But the possibilities are exciting, and I look forward to benefiting from the new district in the near future.

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Signal Contributor

Signal Contributor

Curtis Woods: Water districts’ $14 million savings – what does this mean?

Imagine what $14 million in savings can do for Santa Clarita Valley residents.

This amount is the projected savings achieved by creating a new water district from the existing Castaic Lake Water Agency (CLWA) and Newhall County Water District (NCWD). If it sounds like a lot, it is.

In fact, it is $1 million more than Newhall County Water District’s annual budget!

So what can these savings do for us, customers of NCWD or CLWA’s Santa Clarita Water Division?

First, they could positively impact local water rates. While fluctuations to rates are generally based on numerous (and oftentimes uncontrollable) factors, savings could be used to keep rates low for customers.

The $14 million could also help build critical infrastructure. Whether it’s modernizing outdated pipes or creating a new recycled water program, these savings could go a long way to improving our local water system.

It could also be used to upgrade customer service and create new benefits for the public. New technologies and web-based tools can be a part of a modern water agency.

Putting the savings to use will be the decision of the new Board of Directors for the new water district. But the possibilities are exciting, and I look forward to benefiting from the new district in the near future.