Gene Uzawa Dorio, M.D.: What’s in a name? More than politics, we hope
Group four, left to right: Diane Trautman, Brett Haddock, Ronda Baldwin-Kennedy, Tito Gonzalez, and Gene Dorio discuss issues that affect the Santa Clarita Valley at the Signal's City Council Forum on Thursday, Jan. 12, 2017 at College of the Canyons' University Center. Katharine Lotze/Signal
By Signal Contributor
Tuesday, July 25th, 2017

Someday in the future, my great great granddaughter will get directions trying to find me in the city of Santa Clarita. She will be told to follow Cameron Smyth Boulevard, turn right at the Laurene Weste Riding Stables, go past the Marsha McLean Tap Dance School and Bob Kellar Police Academy, and make a left at Bill Miranda Parkway.

These names might sound familiar to some of you, as they belong to our five hard-working City Council members.

On a recent visit to Washington, D.C., I noticed many public buildings named after elected politicians. I have no problems with the Washington Monument, Lincoln Memorial, and the Kennedy Center as they honor those patriots who founded and molded this country.

But look around our community and see how elected officials have tattooed and labeled their names onto the public landscape. Name recognition is needed for re-election. It also memorializes the names of politicians in perpetuity.

But, they are elected officials and public servants, and should not have this ability to honor themselves.

The distinction should go to citizens who shape our children, sacrifice their lives, are first responders, or who brought honor to our city. Like, for example, the George Pederson Sheriff’s Station, Gladys Laney Drive, and Army Specialist Rudy Acosta Park.

These are teachers, firefighters, law enforcement, military veterans, and others who are heroes of our valley and should have this recognition.

To insure this legacy in the future, I propose a city ballot proposition stating that no living elected official have his or her name placed on a park, street, bridge, building, or any other public structure.

This will indelibly etch the fitting history of those individuals who have been the foundation of our city.

Someday in the future, my great great granddaughter will get directions and be able to find me in Santa Clarita at the Gene Uzawa Dorio Memorial Cemetery.

Gene Uzawa Dorio, M.D.
Saugus

About the author

Signal Contributor

Signal Contributor

Group four, left to right: Diane Trautman, Brett Haddock, Ronda Baldwin-Kennedy, Tito Gonzalez, and Gene Dorio discuss issues that affect the Santa Clarita Valley at the Signal's City Council Forum on Thursday, Jan. 12, 2017 at College of the Canyons' University Center. Katharine Lotze/Signal

Gene Uzawa Dorio, M.D.: What’s in a name? More than politics, we hope

Someday in the future, my great great granddaughter will get directions trying to find me in the city of Santa Clarita. She will be told to follow Cameron Smyth Boulevard, turn right at the Laurene Weste Riding Stables, go past the Marsha McLean Tap Dance School and Bob Kellar Police Academy, and make a left at Bill Miranda Parkway.

These names might sound familiar to some of you, as they belong to our five hard-working City Council members.

On a recent visit to Washington, D.C., I noticed many public buildings named after elected politicians. I have no problems with the Washington Monument, Lincoln Memorial, and the Kennedy Center as they honor those patriots who founded and molded this country.

But look around our community and see how elected officials have tattooed and labeled their names onto the public landscape. Name recognition is needed for re-election. It also memorializes the names of politicians in perpetuity.

But, they are elected officials and public servants, and should not have this ability to honor themselves.

The distinction should go to citizens who shape our children, sacrifice their lives, are first responders, or who brought honor to our city. Like, for example, the George Pederson Sheriff’s Station, Gladys Laney Drive, and Army Specialist Rudy Acosta Park.

These are teachers, firefighters, law enforcement, military veterans, and others who are heroes of our valley and should have this recognition.

To insure this legacy in the future, I propose a city ballot proposition stating that no living elected official have his or her name placed on a park, street, bridge, building, or any other public structure.

This will indelibly etch the fitting history of those individuals who have been the foundation of our city.

Someday in the future, my great great granddaughter will get directions and be able to find me in Santa Clarita at the Gene Uzawa Dorio Memorial Cemetery.

Gene Uzawa Dorio, M.D.
Saugus