Line or Spot Putting?
Metro Creative
By Hans Kersting, Golf Professional
Monday, April 16th, 2018

Do you draw a line on your ball to assist with your putting?  It’s a practice done by most professionals, and many amateurs, throughout the game.  The concept is simple.  Draw a straight line on your golf ball, and then aim the line in the direction you want your ball to roll.  Simple as that.  But, is this what works best for you?

One issue that I have encountered with golfers who draw lines on their ball is the issue of trusting their vision.  After carefully lining their ball up towards their target, they immediately question the alignment once they stand over the ball to putt.  It suddenly looks different.  This different look creates uncertainty, which ultimately leads to an inability to completely commit to your putt.

If you find yourself questioning the alignment of your golf ball in this way, I would suggest adjusting your routine to becoming more of a spot putter.  Spot putting allows for you to be a bit more intuitive with your approach.

To be an effective spot putter, it is important to pick a spot no more than three feet in front of your ball to aim at.  You should be able to see this spot with your peripheral vision as you stand over your ball.  Sometimes you may pick an old ball mark to aim at, or perhaps a patch of grass that is colored slightly different than the rest.

Putting is the one part of the game that EVERYBODY can learn to be great.  Being a good putter does not require strength, or flexibility.  There are no limitations.  However, to become a great putter does require a sound routine.  It does not matter if you choose to line your putt up using a line on your ball, or if you choose to aim at a spot in front of your ball using your peripheral vision.  All that matters is that you commit to one, or the other.

Enjoy the journey to becoming better.

About the author

Hans Kersting

Hans Kersting, Golf Professional

Metro Creative

Line or Spot Putting?

Do you draw a line on your ball to assist with your putting?  It’s a practice done by most professionals, and many amateurs, throughout the game.  The concept is simple.  Draw a straight line on your golf ball, and then aim the line in the direction you want your ball to roll.  Simple as that.  But, is this what works best for you?

One issue that I have encountered with golfers who draw lines on their ball is the issue of trusting their vision.  After carefully lining their ball up towards their target, they immediately question the alignment once they stand over the ball to putt.  It suddenly looks different.  This different look creates uncertainty, which ultimately leads to an inability to completely commit to your putt.

If you find yourself questioning the alignment of your golf ball in this way, I would suggest adjusting your routine to becoming more of a spot putter.  Spot putting allows for you to be a bit more intuitive with your approach.

To be an effective spot putter, it is important to pick a spot no more than three feet in front of your ball to aim at.  You should be able to see this spot with your peripheral vision as you stand over your ball.  Sometimes you may pick an old ball mark to aim at, or perhaps a patch of grass that is colored slightly different than the rest.

Putting is the one part of the game that EVERYBODY can learn to be great.  Being a good putter does not require strength, or flexibility.  There are no limitations.  However, to become a great putter does require a sound routine.  It does not matter if you choose to line your putt up using a line on your ball, or if you choose to aim at a spot in front of your ball using your peripheral vision.  All that matters is that you commit to one, or the other.

Enjoy the journey to becoming better.