Gene Uzawa Dorio, M.D.: Let’s look at going Dutch for health care
By Signal Contributor
Monday, December 26th, 2016

Statistics bear out Americans are not receiving worthy dollar-for-dollar health care compared to other countries, as suggested in the Jim De Bree column “Should Obamacare go Dutch?” published Dec. 8 in The Signal.

The 17.5 percent cost to our economy still encompasses exorbitant profit extracted by insurance companies, hospitals and BigPharma.

We are propagandized to believe our country has the best health-care system in the world, but the bottom line accompanies persistent outrage for those trying to receive care.

There are many health-care models around the world that should be considered, including those of Holland, Taiwan, Norway and Japan.

Constantly, the system in Canada/England is denounced, despite their program being much more efficient.

Plus, obtaining medication from overseas is ballyhooed as poor quality if obtained from foreign pharmacies, despite being manufactured by U.S. companies.

We must combine Workers Compensation, the Veterans Administration, and whatever health insurance members of Congress receive into a system that allows us health care so we are able to compete in the world marketplace.

Considering going Dutch might be a viable option.

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Signal Contributor

Signal Contributor

Gene Uzawa Dorio, M.D.: Let’s look at going Dutch for health care

Statistics bear out Americans are not receiving worthy dollar-for-dollar health care compared to other countries, as suggested in the Jim De Bree column “Should Obamacare go Dutch?” published Dec. 8 in The Signal.

The 17.5 percent cost to our economy still encompasses exorbitant profit extracted by insurance companies, hospitals and BigPharma.

We are propagandized to believe our country has the best health-care system in the world, but the bottom line accompanies persistent outrage for those trying to receive care.

There are many health-care models around the world that should be considered, including those of Holland, Taiwan, Norway and Japan.

Constantly, the system in Canada/England is denounced, despite their program being much more efficient.

Plus, obtaining medication from overseas is ballyhooed as poor quality if obtained from foreign pharmacies, despite being manufactured by U.S. companies.

We must combine Workers Compensation, the Veterans Administration, and whatever health insurance members of Congress receive into a system that allows us health care so we are able to compete in the world marketplace.

Considering going Dutch might be a viable option.