Thomas Oatway: Compromise is inevitable
Former candidate for the County Board of Supervisors district five Darryl Park holds a sign and an American Flag as part of a protest against the repeal and replacement of the Affordable Care Act. Katharine Lotze/The Signal
By Signal Contributor
Friday, June 30th, 2017

Brian Baker is adamant that “some differences of opinion are so fundamental that there’s no compromise possible” (“Socialized medicine: You’re for it or against it” in Thursday’s Signal Opinion section).

He states that this is the case for health care policy and argues that free market advocates will never be able to compromise on introducing socialized medicine into national health-care policy.

He argues that the “final truth” for conservatives is that if government-run health care (socialized medicine) is allowed to be incorporated in health-care policy, it is like being a little bit pregnant. Thus compromise is a non-starter.

For those of us over 65, the reality is that public and private health-care insurance becomes secondary and Medicare becomes our primary coverage. Medicare is government-run and the government negotiates benefits, payments to providers, and coverage limits.

If Mr. Baker is over 65, and on Medicare, he is pregnant with socialized medicine. Now can we start the discussion on compromise?

 

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Signal Contributor

Signal Contributor

Former candidate for the County Board of Supervisors district five Darryl Park holds a sign and an American Flag as part of a protest against the repeal and replacement of the Affordable Care Act. Katharine Lotze/The Signal

Thomas Oatway: Compromise is inevitable

Brian Baker is adamant that “some differences of opinion are so fundamental that there’s no compromise possible” (“Socialized medicine: You’re for it or against it” in Thursday’s Signal Opinion section).

He states that this is the case for health care policy and argues that free market advocates will never be able to compromise on introducing socialized medicine into national health-care policy.

He argues that the “final truth” for conservatives is that if government-run health care (socialized medicine) is allowed to be incorporated in health-care policy, it is like being a little bit pregnant. Thus compromise is a non-starter.

For those of us over 65, the reality is that public and private health-care insurance becomes secondary and Medicare becomes our primary coverage. Medicare is government-run and the government negotiates benefits, payments to providers, and coverage limits.

If Mr. Baker is over 65, and on Medicare, he is pregnant with socialized medicine. Now can we start the discussion on compromise?