Out of the bunker: choosing the right putter
By Hans Kersting, Golf Professional
Friday, November 3rd, 2017

I was rummaging through my garage the other day, and I came across about 10 old putters of mine.

I had a little bit of everything. From an old bullseye I used back in high school, to the 50” long putter I used up until a couple of years ago.

Each putter I came across provided me with great memories, as well as some I’d rather forget. But the beauty of a putter is that you can always go back to using it when times get tough.

Unlike most clubs, putters never seem to age. My old bullseye can roll the ball into the hole just as easily as today’s modern putters.

The key is finding a putter that looks good to your eye, and feels comfortable in your hands.  Putting is all about confidence, and when you lose confidence in the putter you are currently using, it’s a great idea to experiment with something different.

Don’t be afraid to revert to a putter from your past. Putting is unlike any other facet of this wonderful game.

I tell my students all the time that putting is the one area that anybody can be great.

Simply put, to be a good putter you need to focus on only two keys ideas.

Proper line and proper distance.

You don’t need that $300 Scotty Cameron to become a great putter. Your $10 putter from your neighbor’s garage sale can roll your ball on the proper line with the proper distance.

It may not be as pretty as the putters being used by others in your group, but who cares?

To be a good putter, you need to be confident. During times that I am struggling, I am not afraid to revert to a putter that I have had success with in the past. Many of you can benefit from this same idea.

Don’t be afraid to experiment with several types of putters. Drivers tend to all resemble one another, but putters come in all different shapes and sizes.  Find the putter that looks and feels the best to you, and work on become great.

Who knows?

The right putter for you may be sitting in the corner of your garage just waiting for a second chance.

 

About the author

Hans Kersting

Hans Kersting, Golf Professional

Out of the bunker: choosing the right putter

I was rummaging through my garage the other day, and I came across about 10 old putters of mine.

I had a little bit of everything. From an old bullseye I used back in high school, to the 50” long putter I used up until a couple of years ago.

Each putter I came across provided me with great memories, as well as some I’d rather forget. But the beauty of a putter is that you can always go back to using it when times get tough.

Unlike most clubs, putters never seem to age. My old bullseye can roll the ball into the hole just as easily as today’s modern putters.

The key is finding a putter that looks good to your eye, and feels comfortable in your hands.  Putting is all about confidence, and when you lose confidence in the putter you are currently using, it’s a great idea to experiment with something different.

Don’t be afraid to revert to a putter from your past. Putting is unlike any other facet of this wonderful game.

I tell my students all the time that putting is the one area that anybody can be great.

Simply put, to be a good putter you need to focus on only two keys ideas.

Proper line and proper distance.

You don’t need that $300 Scotty Cameron to become a great putter. Your $10 putter from your neighbor’s garage sale can roll your ball on the proper line with the proper distance.

It may not be as pretty as the putters being used by others in your group, but who cares?

To be a good putter, you need to be confident. During times that I am struggling, I am not afraid to revert to a putter that I have had success with in the past. Many of you can benefit from this same idea.

Don’t be afraid to experiment with several types of putters. Drivers tend to all resemble one another, but putters come in all different shapes and sizes.  Find the putter that looks and feels the best to you, and work on become great.

Who knows?

The right putter for you may be sitting in the corner of your garage just waiting for a second chance.

 

About the author

Hans Kersting

Hans Kersting, Golf Professional