Cher Gilmore: Take advantage of greener energy

By Signal Contributor

Last update: Monday, February 12th, 2018

“Clean power alliance begins serving its first customers” (Feb 1)

Thank you for the piece announcing that consumers in some cities in Los Angeles County will be able this year to choose greener energy through the Clean Power Alliance (formerly Community Choice Energy).

In reading the article, I couldn’t fail to notice that Santa Clarita is not on the list of cities taking advantage of the program, and I wonder why the City Council would choose not to participate.

Through the alliance, cities can save money by joining in a coalition to purchase electricity wholesale and can then pass the savings on to residents and businesses. Greenhouse gas emissions could be decreased by up to 9 percent in the region, which would improve residents’ respiratory health.

What’s not to like about this program?

Could Southern California Edison, which now has a virtual monopoly on electricity in this area, be pressuring the City Council not to participate because it might affect their bottom line?

I’m sure if residents of Santa Clarita were asked, they would want to have greater choice in the kind of energy they’re using, renewable vs. fossil fuel, lower prices and better air quality.

The City Council would do well to join this alliance, putting the welfare of the people they represent, and voters, first, while at the same time furthering their plan to make Santa Clarita greener.

Cher Gilmore
Newhall

About the author

Signal Contributor

Signal Contributor

Cher Gilmore: Take advantage of greener energy

“Clean power alliance begins serving its first customers” (Feb 1)

Thank you for the piece announcing that consumers in some cities in Los Angeles County will be able this year to choose greener energy through the Clean Power Alliance (formerly Community Choice Energy).

In reading the article, I couldn’t fail to notice that Santa Clarita is not on the list of cities taking advantage of the program, and I wonder why the City Council would choose not to participate.

Through the alliance, cities can save money by joining in a coalition to purchase electricity wholesale and can then pass the savings on to residents and businesses. Greenhouse gas emissions could be decreased by up to 9 percent in the region, which would improve residents’ respiratory health.

What’s not to like about this program?

Could Southern California Edison, which now has a virtual monopoly on electricity in this area, be pressuring the City Council not to participate because it might affect their bottom line?

I’m sure if residents of Santa Clarita were asked, they would want to have greater choice in the kind of energy they’re using, renewable vs. fossil fuel, lower prices and better air quality.

The City Council would do well to join this alliance, putting the welfare of the people they represent, and voters, first, while at the same time furthering their plan to make Santa Clarita greener.

Cher Gilmore
Newhall