Carl Boyer: Some things never change
By Signal Contributor
Wednesday, June 28th, 2017

And among those things is the wait for county supervisors.

I arrived at the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on time at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday wanting to speak on an agenda issue.

Years ago I pushed for city formation because attending the county supervisors’ meetings required taking a day off work and waiting hours to get anything done.

Things have not changed much.

It is true there are no longer five white men on the board. There are no white men; four are ladies.

However, the meetings still drag on.

If we had our own county we would not spend an hour handing out commendations.

Commendations are important. When I was mayor of Santa Clarita one of my favorite jobs was commending people who had done great things.

However, in a county of more than 10 million people the number of awards at every meeting is huge.

Then the county’s position on the health care issue was discussed at great length.

In short, I waited 2½ hours to be allowed to speak for one minute.

I truly pity anyone who wants to speak on a general topic. They have to wait to the end of the meeting.

At least one thing has changed. You no longer have to go through security as part of going to the bathroom.

Carl Boyer
Santa Clarita

About the author

Signal Contributor

Signal Contributor

Carl Boyer: Some things never change

And among those things is the wait for county supervisors.

I arrived at the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on time at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday wanting to speak on an agenda issue.

Years ago I pushed for city formation because attending the county supervisors’ meetings required taking a day off work and waiting hours to get anything done.

Things have not changed much.

It is true there are no longer five white men on the board. There are no white men; four are ladies.

However, the meetings still drag on.

If we had our own county we would not spend an hour handing out commendations.

Commendations are important. When I was mayor of Santa Clarita one of my favorite jobs was commending people who had done great things.

However, in a county of more than 10 million people the number of awards at every meeting is huge.

Then the county’s position on the health care issue was discussed at great length.

In short, I waited 2½ hours to be allowed to speak for one minute.

I truly pity anyone who wants to speak on a general topic. They have to wait to the end of the meeting.

At least one thing has changed. You no longer have to go through security as part of going to the bathroom.

Carl Boyer
Santa Clarita