Marivel Magsaysay: The generation gap: It must not separate us
By Signal Contributor
Wednesday, August 2nd, 2017

As a young recent high school graduate, I’ve recognized the pointless fight between my generation and older generations. Millennials. We don’t work for anything we have.

We don’t care about anything that goes on in our world, and we don’t even have to wait for the internet to load before we’re “snapchatting” and “tweeting.” Or so it’s perceived by the other generations.

But when Collin Gore, a friend of mine in my Hart graduating class, passed away this Fourth of July, I saw quite the opposite.

And when countless numbers of my friends drove down to Los Angeles to participate in the Women’s March in January, I saw people my age proving that stigma wrong.

Millennials do care. We’re surrounded by contradictory opinions and the jaded judgments of those who came before us, but we care about making this world better than when we entered it.

We might be completely wrong in our approach or ideas and we might seem radical to other generations, but we show our compassion by banding together and enacting change in the ways we’re familiar with – from spreading the word through social media, debating heavily online about different issues prevalent today, and even mourning together as a community both online and in person, giving our condolences to a family who lost their son all too soon.

There is no point to the fight between generations. We were raised in different times with different opportunities available to us and with different values for living.

But regardless of our generation and age gap, I think it’s more important to remember that we’re all just Americans trying to make our country and world a better place for all in this polarized political climate.

Marivel Magsaysay
Santa Clarita

About the author

Signal Contributor

Signal Contributor

Marivel Magsaysay: The generation gap: It must not separate us

As a young recent high school graduate, I’ve recognized the pointless fight between my generation and older generations. Millennials. We don’t work for anything we have.

We don’t care about anything that goes on in our world, and we don’t even have to wait for the internet to load before we’re “snapchatting” and “tweeting.” Or so it’s perceived by the other generations.

But when Collin Gore, a friend of mine in my Hart graduating class, passed away this Fourth of July, I saw quite the opposite.

And when countless numbers of my friends drove down to Los Angeles to participate in the Women’s March in January, I saw people my age proving that stigma wrong.

Millennials do care. We’re surrounded by contradictory opinions and the jaded judgments of those who came before us, but we care about making this world better than when we entered it.

We might be completely wrong in our approach or ideas and we might seem radical to other generations, but we show our compassion by banding together and enacting change in the ways we’re familiar with – from spreading the word through social media, debating heavily online about different issues prevalent today, and even mourning together as a community both online and in person, giving our condolences to a family who lost their son all too soon.

There is no point to the fight between generations. We were raised in different times with different opportunities available to us and with different values for living.

But regardless of our generation and age gap, I think it’s more important to remember that we’re all just Americans trying to make our country and world a better place for all in this polarized political climate.

Marivel Magsaysay
Santa Clarita